“I love you until the end of time.”

SLAIN COP’S WIDOW RECEIVES STANDING OVATION IN PACKED ST. PAT’S

The young widow of slain NYPD officer Jason Rivera delivered a gut-wrenching eulogy at his funeral Friday in St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

“You have the whole nation on gridlock and although you won’t be here anymore, I want you to live through me,” Dominique Luzuriaga said before the packed church on Fifth Avenue.

Moving eulogy by cop’s widow

Jason “is so happy” that you all came to honor him and the service “is exactly how he would have wanted to be remembered. Like a true hero,” she said.

“I love you until the end of time,” she said of the man who had been her sweetheart since grade school. They had been married for just over three months.

“We’ll take the watch from here,” she told mourners at St. Patrick’s Cathedral as they gave her a standing ovation. 

Dominique and Jason had an argument before he left for work that fatal Friday. “It’s hard being a cop’s wife sometimes,” she said.

Later that day, when she heard that Jason, 22, and his partner Wilbert Mora, 27, had been gunned down during a domestic violence call in Harlem, she was racked with guilt.

Moving eulogy by cop’s widow
Jason Rivera and Wilbert Mora

“Seeing you in a hospital bed, not hearing you when I was talking to you broke me,” she told the congregation.

“I said to you, Wake up baby, I’m here. The little bit of hope I had that you would come back to life just to say goodbye or say I love you one more time had left. I was lost. I’m still lost. Today I’m still in this nightmare.”


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You try to help people and you get killed for it

The New York City woman who was pushed to her death in front of a subway train by a homeless psycho was known for her volunteer work with the homeless.

Michelle Go, 40, senior manager at a top consulting firm, had another life — helping the homeless and others less fortunate than herself put their lives back together.

Everyone who knew Michelle described her as a kind and wonderful person.

Michelle was waiting on the southbound platform at the Times Square subway station Saturday morning when the homeless ex-con shoved her into the path of an oncoming train.

Homeless helper killed by homeless

Simon Martial, 61, showed no emotion when he turned himself into the police. He said her pushed her to her death because he is God.


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Burger King killer caught

A homeless thug with a criminal record has been arrested in the cold-blooded murder of a 19-year-old cashier who was gunned down after handing him $100 during a robbery.

Burger Killer killer caught
Kristal Bayron

Winston Glynn, a 30-year-old Jamaican was charged with first-degree murder and robbery in the January 9 slaying of Kristal Bayron in a Burger King at East 116th Street and Lexington Avenue in Queens.

The monster shot her down as she crouched in terror by a second cash register which she tried to open to comply with his demand for more cash, but she didn’t have the key.

Glynn once worked at the same Burger King but did not know his victim. He lives at a Days Inn in Queens that has been turned into a homeless shelter.

SOFT-ON-CRIME DA

Burger King killer caught
DA Alvin Bragg

Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg, notoriously known for his soft-on-crime approach to law enforcement — including downgrading many felony charges and eliminating prison time for most crimes — was at Glynn’s arraignment, but made no comment.

NYPD detectives who nailed Glynn through painstaking police work hope he won’t go soft on this killer.

New York City’s new Mayor Eric Adams, who campaigned on a law-and-order platform, was moved when he visited Kristal’s mother after the slaying.

“When I visited her mother, I saw the pain on the face, how much this tore her apart,” he said, calling the suspect a “cold-blooded killer.”

Kristal worked the night shift at the East Harlem Burger King and told her mother before going to work that night that she was afraid because of all the homeless people who hang around the fast-food joint.

EARLIER STORY HERE


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