From World War I mortars to six shooters

Way back in World War I, Randy Scott was a 19-year-old artillery man with the Trench Mortar Division in France. His training in firearms and horsemanship later came in handy in more than 60 westerns.

Remembering Randolph Scott who died March 2, 1987

In a movie career that ran from 1928 to 1962 Randolph Scott acted in comedies, musicals, crime dramas, war films and even some horror movies.

And Nancy carroll
Scott with Nancy Carroll in the 1932 drama ‘Hot Saturday.’

But it wasn’t until 1946, when he played a cowboy hero in Abilene Town that his future acting career was set in the saddle. From then on, all but two of his films were Westerns, and more than any other major movie star of that era Randolph Scott became the face and character of the Old West.

With saddle

MALIBU ROOMMATES

Randolph Scott shared a Malibu beach house with his close friend Cary Grant from 1932 to 1944, feeding rumors that the two actors were lovers, but the steady stream of women in and out of their so-called ‘Bachelor Hall’ appeared to refute the gossip.

Malibu roommates

The two movie stars remained close friends for the rest of their lives. When Scott was told of Cary Grant’s death in 1986 at the age of 82, he put his head in his hands and wept. Randolph Scott died two months later at 89.

SCOTT’S LAST MOVIE

The leathery old cowboy teamed up with Joel McCrea in 1962 for his farewell Western, Sam Peckinpah’s Ride the High Country, which is still regarded as a classic, marking the end of the Old West.

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Cops bust risqué actress — and Mae West’s career is born

Remembering the “Come up and see me sometime” vamp of yesteryear

The sex superstar of the 1930s started out writing her own risqué plays. Her first starring role on Broadway was in ’Sex,’ a 1926 play she wrote, produced, and directed.

Is that a gun in your pocket....

Puritanical critics panned the show, but the public loved it. Religious groups were the loudest critics and their complaints prompted the cops to raid the theater. Mae West and the cast were arrested.

Mae was prosecuted on morals charges, and on April 19, 1927, was sentenced to 10 days for “corrupting the morals of youth.” She could have paid a fine and gone free, but she chose the jail sentence for the publicity.

Mae West‘s first starring role

Mae served eight days of her sentence. She is shown below leaving the West 47th Street police station. (Photo/New York Daily News)

Mae West‘s first starring role

Mae West bucked the system, making comedy out of conventional mores, and the Depression-era audience admired her for it. When her cinematic career ended, she wrote books and plays and continued to perform in Las Vegas and in the UK, on radio and television, and she recorded rock and roll albums.

She was born on August 17, 1893, in Brooklyn, N.Y. Her father was a prizefighter known as ‘Battlin’ Jack West’ who later worked as a ‘special policeman’ and then became a private investigator. Her mother Mathilda modeled corsets.

Mae West introduced her Diamond Lil character in the 1933 film ‘She Done Him Wrong’ co-staring Cary Grant in one of his first major roles.

She became one of the biggest box office stars in America, and two years later, the highest paid woman and the second-highest paid person in the U.S., after publisher William Randolph Hearst.

The American Film Institute named her 15th among the greatest female stars of classic American cinema.

She died on November 22, 198O, at her home, Apartment 611 at the Ravenswood Apartments on 570 North Rossmore Avenue in Hollywood. She was 88.

MAE WEST NO. 611

Mae West was entombed at Cypress Hills Cemetery along with her parents and brother John in her hometown of Brooklyn, N.Y. Her younger sister Beverly was entombed there a year later.


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