Shell shock routine

Grief by any other name is still hell

Grief counselors are now referring to prolonged grieving as an “adjustment disorder.” What kind of b.s. language is that?

To me, the grief of losing a life companion, a loved one, a soulmate or a family member is hell on earth. There are some things in life to which one may never, or should, become “adjusted.”

This “adjustment disorder” bull reminds me of the George Carlin routine where he ridicules America’s penchant for euphemisms. 

CAPITALIZING ON BEREAVEMENT

Grief, by the way, is quite a business. Grief counselors charge up to $200 an hour.

But, don’t despair, like any commercial enterprise, there are always bargains out there. How about these online offers:

Grief is Lonely — Special Promo — Save 25% now! Call —

50% Off This Weekend Only — No. 1 Rated


Grief support to your phone for only $99 $74.25. Personalized based on your loss.


Okay, so $74.25 is a helluva deal, no way to beat that, and I know grief counseling can help a lot of people (who have the money), but to me, the idea of making any money off someone’s grief is not cool.

At the medical clinic I go to, all the doctors accept my health insurance — with an acceptable co-pay. The only ones who don’t are—yeah!—the grief counselors. They want cold hard cash.

So I say screw that, and go home to my cat. She’s a good listener. I talk to her about my loss and she listens and she doesn’t give me any b.s. and mess with my head. And her only fee is salmon on a small plate and a little lovin’.

I’m cool with that.


4 thoughts on “Grief by any other name is still hell

  1. Hey! Brother Mich, your brother up^ here in Alaska, just woke from a long sleep, my thousand words done for this day, the weirdest thing just happened to me, All of a sudden I got like 185 e-mails from people all over this world, to me this little old guy sitting in his log cabin, I cannot possibly answer them all, so I am going to write a letter on Word-Press here and just hope some one will tell me what I had to say that was so interesting to them, I always thought that I was whistling into the wind on here, so many people, so many Good Stories to Read & Enjoy, I can hardly keep up^! So many compassionate people who told me to respect Susan’s life, by keeping on with life, by the time I got the message I had just about starved myself to death, my good, good, neighbors stopped in, gifted me with soup & Love, so here I am Brother Mich, writing a note to you, to tell you do NOT GIVE UP^, I am still awaiting word from Susan’s kids, maybe I have become invisible to them? Well I did not make it to 74 + years by impatience, so I will just wait them out, and it is up^ to them to make the next move in this Chess Game…..

  2. You’ re so right, dear Sir. It isn’t only America. This kind of “medical” attitude – i don’t know how to properly call it- happens all over the world. They come up with strange titles, and words, and acronyms. And they create categories to park the symptoms in there. Which is fine. And convenient, nevertheless, for the so-called specialists. Since they don’t have to think a lot for some kind of diagnosis. They don’t have enough time, probably. And, of course, they have pills for everything. It doesn’t matter if they do not have a diagnosis, they have pills.

    The next generations are gonna be in real trouble because of this game with the words.

    Ps 1: Do not misunderstand me, we should and we must take some kind of help, when we need the help. It is the right thing to visit a consultant, or a medical doctor, or whatever is out there. The difficult part is to find the proper help. Despite the plethora of the specialists, i think we still need to spend time to find the proper one. Anyway, dear Sir, i like your epilogue a lot !

    Ps 2: George Carlin was awesome ! Thanks for sharing this.

    1. PTSD is the classic b.s. acronym, as Carlin noted, and as for the medical business in America, it’s an assembly line, like Amazon, that charges hundreds of dollars for a simple visit to the clinic and tens of thousands for hospital care, and my wife was on that assembly line and now she’s gone.

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